A Small Outing

Last December, little bears were out for a walk and passed by the Wee Bar on Oxford Street, Mount Hawthorn. With their busy social calendar πŸ™‚ it took them another 6 months to visit the bar. And to their surprise, it was now the Budburst Small Bar.

The bar went from this…

Wee Bar
Wee Bar
Wee Bar
Wee Bar
Wee Bar
Wee Bar

To this…

Budburst Small Bar
Budburst Small Bar
Budburst Small Bar
Budburst Small Bar
Budburst Small Bar
Budburst Small Bar
Budburst Small Bar
Budburst Small Bar

Little bears would have loved to play musical chairs on the eclectic furniture of the Wee Bar, but by all accounts the food is just as good as before.

The Small Bar

Cores da Terra Rubro Cereja

Selma Abdon Calheira is an amazing ceramist and an extremely determined woman with artistic vision and a deep compassion for the less advantaged. The fantastic fruits, vegetables and other creations she designs are the products of Cores da Terra – Earth Tones. The name itself was coined by Selma because of her lifelong interest in clay and her research into natural pigments. It was growing up in the countryside of Bahia that influenced her work with clay, painting and organic pigments. Inspired by the exotic opulence of Brazilian nature, she creates the brilliant and unique collection of ceramic sculptures on an abandoned cocoa plantation.

Selma’s journey has resulted in an amazingly successful enterprise which has brought extraordinary success to the rural economy of Bahia. She set up Cores da Terra in 1984 after completing her art studies and gaining initial work experience. She was in immediate demand from major professional institutions as a guest speaker and teacher due to her expertise in the field of natural pigments. Through Selma’s efforts Cores da Terra has catapulted into the high-end marketplace of international ceramics. In the 90s, her works won international recognition following exhibitions in 1996 in New York, in June 1998 at the Carrousel du Louvre and in November 1998 at the United Nations Women’s Guild Annual Bazaar in Geneva.

During this time se created her first giant ceramic apples, a design that has proved timeless.

The Cores da Terra mission is to produce decorative objects with such perfection that art and reality mingle. It’s one of the few companies that truly delivers on its mission! They produce beautifully crafted fruits and vegetables in painted terracotta that are simply stunning in their colour and variety of size! Enormous apples, pears and cherries sit with delightful ease next to their tiny counterparts.

There are also pears, plums, figs and a variety of other fruit and vegetables. We are, of course, partial to the cherries πŸ™‚

Cores da Terra Cherries

Cores da Terra Cherries

Selma’s studio provides jobs to over 100 people. Since the beginning Selma purposely looked to hire economically disadvantaged people, nearly all of whom were unemployed or under employed, some of them living in favelas. Today they are professional ceramists. In 1996 Selma received the ‘Gente Que Faz’ award for her work with economically disadvantaged people. Through her work and her studio, Selma brings hope and opportunity to the people of Ibirataia region and neighboring municipalities, providing jobs, education and better prospects for the future.

In Australia, you can find Selma’s ceramics at Parterre, http://www.parterre.com.au.

The very large cherries (photo at the top) are priced by Parterre at $1495 each! Luckily, they don’t have any cherries in stock, so I don’t have to wrestle with temptation. Wouldn’t mind paying this much if I knew the money was going to Selma for the incredible work she does, but I am pretty sure the 300%+ mark up goes to the Australian studio for their profits. On the other hand, imagine carrying that apple on the plane! Or a 1.1m tall cherry. I would still have to get the cherries across from Sydney, but for the difference in price, I can fly to Belgium to personally bring a couple of giant cherries home.

If you can navigate Brazilian Portuguese, this is the official website:

http://www.coresdaterra.com.br/

Decadent Cherry Fruit Trifle

This looks delicious!

Decadent Cherry Fruit Trifles

Cherries, peaches and raspberries on sponge finger biscuits dipped in dessert wine topped with custard and fresh cream. Yummy!

Decadent Cherry Fruit Trifles

Mmmm, our trifle has cherry brandy…

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The fruit trifle is easy to put together and very tasty. Light, luscious and refreshing, you can’t stop at just one piece.

Decadent Cherry Fruit Trifles

Little bears have discovered the chocolate cherry coffee…

Decadent Cherry Fruit Trifles

It’s going to be a long, long night…

Decadent Cherry Fruit Trifles

Delightful Salads

This salad is tricky! Does sweet potato count as dessert? It’s sweet!

Sweet potato and cherry salad
Sweet potato and cherry salad

Tender sweet potatoes tossed with crunchy walnuts and fresh cherries provide a burst of healthy flavour!

Delightful Salads

Another easy and delicious treat is the roast beetroot and cherry salad with grilled chicken.

Delightful Salads

Paired with St Louis kriek πŸ™‚

Roast beetroot and cherry salad with grilled chicken
Roast beetroot and cherry salad with grilled chicken

Healthy and easy to prepare, these salads are a must try! Even by little bears πŸ™‚

Delightful Salads

Chorus of Yums

Yay, no more vegetables πŸ™‚

Chorus of Yums

Whether savory or sweet, dishes made with puff pastry tend to elicit plenty of “yums”. You add cherries and chocolate to your puff pastry and it’s guaranteed to add “oohs” and “ahhs” to the chorus πŸ™‚

Chorus of Yums

Twisted and flaky, fruity and chocolatey, this pastry is all the bears will ever want for breakfast from here on out. (Cereal? What is that?)

Chorus of Yums

Add cherry & cinnamon tea and it’s a tea party!

Chorus of Yums

Mischief-free zone for the next five minutes…

Chorus of Yums

Look up!

Throughout this month, the two brightest planets in the night sky, the cloud-covered world of Venus and the enormous gas giant Jupiter, have been converging for a jaw-dropping close encounter. You don’t want to miss any of the action. It could be the best backyard sky show of 2015!

Look Up

When the sun goes down, step outside and look west. You don’t have to wait until the sky fades to black. Venus and Jupiter are so bright, you can see them shining through the twilight. In fact, some people say the planets are especially beautiful when they are surrounded by the cobalt hue of the early evening sky, so don’t wait.

The main event occurs on June 30th in the US and other Western countries and on July 1 in Australia and the East. On this night, Venus and Jupiter will be a 1/3rd of a degree apart. That’s less than the diameter of a full Moon. You’ll be able to hide the pair not just behind the palm of your outstretched hand, but behind your little pinky finger.

In these final days of June 2015, the two brightest planets in the night sky are putting on one amazing show. For skywatchers here on Earth, Venus and Jupiter have steadily been drawing closer together since the start of June, and will appear to converge completely on June 30, resembling one super-bright planet in the night sky. It’s the closest the two planets will appear to us until August 2016.

The best part is that you don’t need binoculars or a telescope to see the planets – they’re so bright that they’re visible to the naked eye, and can even be seen during the day at certain times. And for once, you can see the event from anywhere in the world. All you need to do is look to the west for a few hours after sunset.

Look Up

But if you do have a telescope, the view gets even better, with NASA reporting that gazers should be able to see Venus as a waning crescent, and Jupiter surrounded by its moons.

Of course, Venus and Jupiter actually aren’t getting any closer to each other at all: they’re still more than 800 million kilometres apart. But they look closer together to us because of where both planets are in their respective orbits around the Sun. Because Jupiter is much further from the Sun than Venus, it takes much longer to complete a full rotation, and this means that Venus occasionally laps it. When this happens, the two bright planets pass each other in our night sky and look more like one big double star.

Venus, being closer to the sun than the Earth, can only be seen setting in the west after sunset or rising in the east before sunrise, just like Mercury. It’s as if the planets are tied to the sun and can never drift too far away.

The outer planets are another story. Last February, Jupiter reached opposition, a time when the planet rises in the east as the sun sets in the west. Over the last four months, Jupiter has slowly made its way to the western sky to now meet up with Venus.

Look Up

Happy star-gazing!