Searching for Timbits

Little Puffles and Honey decided to go out in search of the elusive Timbits…

Searching for Timbits

The Rideau Canal is the oldest continuously operated canal system in North America, and in 2007 it was registered as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Searching for Timbits

The Rideau Canal was constructed between 1826 and 1832 under the supervision of Lieutenant Colonel John By of the Royal Engineers. The canal provided a secure, defensible supply route from Montreal to Kingston, an alternative to the St Lawrence River in the uneasy years following the War of 1812.

The canal has gone through three different eras in its history. The military period began with its construction but slowly declined over the next couple of decades. Never actually used for military purposes, it soon became a commercial waterway. Timber, potash, feldspar, mica, iron ore and phosphate were transported along the canal by steamer and barge, with destinations such as England, New Jersey and Montreal. In the 1850s, the advent of the railroads provided a quicker and more economical form of transportation, thus causing a declining use of the canal for a brief period. The 1880s heralded the recreational period, with numerous excursion steamers ferrying loads of travellers and sightseers along the length of the canal and into the lakes it traverses. Today, the canal continues to be an international recreational attraction, both by water and by land.

Searching for Timbits

One of 24 lockstations, Ottawa Locks, with its flight of eight locks is more than just an item of passing historic interest. These locks represent an amazing engineering achievement in the middle of the Canadian wilderness of the early 19th century and became the focus around which the city of Ottawa grew. The locks connect the channel of the Rideau Canal in Ottawa to the Ottawa River, almost 24m below. In September 1831, the steamboat Union was the first vessel to pass through the Ottawa Locks.

But not a Timbit in sight!

Fairmont Chateau Laurier
Fairmont Chateau Laurier

And little Puffles and Honey looked everywhere 🙂

Searching for Timbits

Mmmm, pizza!

Searching for Timbits

The search for Timbits was temporarily forgotten, as Puffles and Honey tried the Capri Pesto, Sicilian and Carbonara Pizza from Fiazza.

Back on the search trail…

Colonnade at the National Gallery of Art
Colonnade at the National Gallery of Canada

Puffles and Honey came across the Great Hall at the National Gallery of Canada.

Great Hall at the National Gallery of Canada
Great Hall at the National Gallery of Canada

The Gallery is housed in a glass and granite building on Sussex Drive with a notable view of the Canadian Parliament buildings on Parliament Hill. The building was designed by Moshe Safdie and opened in 1988. It is one of the most striking landmarks in Ottawa.

National Gallery of Canada Glass Tower
National Gallery of Canada Glass Tower
National Gallery of Canada
National Gallery of Canada

But not a Timbit in sight!

Searching for Timbits

Searching for Timbits

Next to the Gallery, Alexandra Bridge spans the Ottawa River between Ottawa, Ontario and Gatineau, Quebec.

Searching for Timbits

Great photo opportunities 🙂 but still no Timbits.

Searching for Timbits

Little Puffles and Honey found a cool place to rest, the Fountain Room at National Arts Centre.

Fountain Room at the National Arts Centre
Fountain Room at the National Arts Centre

It looked like a place for exploration!

Crystal DNA, suspended sculpture at the National Arts Centre
Crystal DNA, suspended sculpture at the National Arts Centre
National Arts Centre
National Arts Centre
National Arts Centre
National Arts Centre
National Arts Centre
National Arts Centre

This chair is very comfy and just the place to rest after climbing so many stairs looking for Timbits!

Searching for Timbits

Oh no, this is the Redemption leitmotif from Wagner’s Ring! And the door is closed, we can’t escape!

Searching for Timbits

We can’t escape this way either…

Searching for Timbits

Little Puffles and Honey found themselves at the final performance of the 2015-16 season, as Music Director Alexander Shelley and the National Arts Centre Orchestra performed music from Wagner’s transcendent Tristan und Isolde with Henk de Vlieger’s symphonic work entitled An Orchestral Passion. Colin Currie, one of the world’s finest percussionists, performed as soloist in Christopher Rouse’s adventurous Der Gerettete Alberich (or “Alberich Saved”), which incorporates the motifs from Wagner’s 16-hour series of operas The Ring of the Nibelungen.

Searching for Timbits

Lots of beautiful music, but still no Timbits 🙂

Puffles what are you doing?

Searching for Timbits

I’m going to wait here until Tim Hortons opens to get Timbits!

Searching for Timbits

Tickles, you have Timbits for us! We looked everywhere all day!

Searching for Timbits

Happy little bears…

Searching for Timbits

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