Esplanade – Theatres on the Bay

On 12 October 2002, Esplanade – Theatres on the Bay opened as Singapore’s national arts centre. It was the first purpose-built arts centre in Singapore in almost 40 years.

The theatre and concert halls are located directly on the bank of the Singapore River, next to a bridge linking the historical part of the city, the river and the modern commercial parts of the city.

Esplanade – Theatres on the Bay, Singapore

The architectural design of the ensemble has a contemporary style, avoiding any reference to superficial ethnic symbolism. The centre combines the standard size and form of concert halls and theatres with expressive architectural features, which are specific to the local climate and the cultural environment.

The entire centre comprises of five performance venues – primarily a 2000-seat theatre and an 1800-seat concert hall; including three smaller studios and a 450-seat outdoor theatre on the waterfront.

The principal idea is based on a three-sided creation, opening out from the central entrance hall and comprising the concert hall, the classical theatre as well as the smaller studios. All parts of the design have their distinct position in the structural hierarchy, with the entrance and a small round courtyard, which opens up to the waterfront, forming the centre of the object. The open design concept gives space for the most different approaches and trends. Archways, balconies and roof terraces form the links between the larger individual elements. They reduce the overall impression to a more perceivable scale, while at the same time smoothly bridging the gap between the internal and external spaces.

Esplanade – Theatres on the Bay, Singapore

The complex comprises a shopping and restaurant arcade, with a multimedia library for theatre, cinematography, music and ballet. The most prominent elements of the new arts centre are the twin glass domes of the two large auditoriums (the Theatre and the Concert Hall) and the aluminium sunshades designed to shield the glass domes, allowing light in while keeping the heat out at the same time.

Cladding detail, Esplanade – Theatres on the Bay

With superb acoustics, the Esplanade Concert Hall was designed by world-renowned acoustician, the late Russell Johnson of ARTEC Consultants Inc, US. Noteworthy acoustics features of the Concert Hall include the acoustic canopy, reverberation chambers and acoustic curtains which enable the hall to adapt to different musical styles and to provide optimum sound quality.

The acoustic canopy above the stage, comprising three separate sections each weighing 17 tonnes, acts as an acoustic reflector that enables onstage musicians to hear themselves. Each section is adjustable and hangs above, roughly, the three sections of an orchestra and chorus – the strings; the woodwinds, brass and percussion; and the chorus. By manipulating the height of the three sections as well as the gaps between them, it is possible to affect the way the musicians hear themselves onstage, as well as the way the audience hears them.

The reverberations chambers, with a volume of 9,500m3, amount to separate rooms, isolated from the main concert hall by a series of airtight wall panels, or chamber doors. But the idea isn’t to keep the doors closed. All of the chamber doors can be opened in increments, anywhere from 0 to 90 degrees. Depending on how many doors are open, where those doors are (at the top, middle or bottom of the hall), and how wide they are open, the sound in the hall can be changed in a variety of ways. For instance, Open doors means there are fewer reflective surfaces in the hall for the sound to bounce off of. The reverberation chambers also provide sound isolation against extraneous noises and an environment which can be temperature, pressure and humidity controlled. The temperature in the Concert Hall is maintained at a constant 21C.

The luxurious curtains that can wrap around the hall are no ordinary decorative draperies, but magical sound soaker-uppers of voluminous velour. The acoustic curtains consist of around 15,000m2 of acoustic velour that can be deployed to wrap the entire hall to reduce unwanted reverberations during amplified performances. When not in use, the curtains are stored in pockets behind the walls.

While the Concert hall is designed especially for symphonic music it is also flexible enough to be used for other types of events.

In addition, the design and choice of materials of the hall’s interior surfaces maximise clarity and quality of music within the hall. The wood used in the hall is Tasmanian Oak.

Concert Hall, Esplanade – Theatres on the Bay
Concert Hall, Esplanade – Theatres on the Bay

The Concert Hall also houses a 4,740-pipe organ with 61 stops which was designed and built by Johannes Klais Orgelbau, from one of the world’s most renowned organ building families. The orchestra platform can accommodate 120 musicians. And four bears 🙂

Concert Hall, Esplanade – Theatres on the Bay

The theatre, with a sitting capacity of 2000, houses Singapore’s largest performing stage and is easily adaptable to a variety of performances. It is designed to present all genres of the performing arts, from classical, traditional or contemporary dance to intimate or large-scale theatre performances. The state-of-the-art stage system has more than 100 functions for hoisting, illumination and screening, and offers more than a thousand variations in stage settings.

Theatre, Esplanade – Theatres on the Bay
Theatre, Esplanade – Theatres on the Bay

Little bears are spying on the rehearsals for Forbidden City: Portrait of an Empress 🙂

Theatre, Circle 3, Esplanade – Theatres on the Bay

Forbidden City: Portrait of an Empress explores the life of one of the most controversial figures in Chinese history – Empress Dowager Tzu Hsi – adored, revered, feared and hated.

The most successful Singapore musical, the story is vividly brought to life with a stirring score and sumptuous costumes designed by London-based Singapore designer Yang Derong.

Forbidden City: Portrait of an Empress
Forbidden City: Portrait of an Empress
Forbidden City: Portrait of an Empress
Forbidden City: Portrait of an Empress

Forbidden City: Portrait of an Empress was staged by the Singapore Repertory Theatre originally on 17-19 October 2002 at the Esplanade – Theatres on the Bay, as part of its opening festival. Little bears loved it!

Forbidden City: Portrait of an Empress
Forbidden City: Portrait of an Empress photo booth 🙂

The Grand Foyer is the showcase of Esplanade-Theatres on the Bay and is the meeting place for guests attending performances. Three types of specially manufactured sheet glass have been utilized to provide high insulation value while shielding occupants from the sun’s infrared rays.

Theatre Foyer, Level 3, Esplanade – Theatres on the Bay
Theatre Foyer, Level 3, Esplanade – Theatres on the Bay

Esplanade – Theatres on the Bay also have a Visual Arts Program, with visual arts presentations located in the unusual spaces offered by Esplanade’s unique architecture. Featuring international and regional artists, the focus on contemporary Singapore and Asian artistic expressions gives a visual dimension to the centre’s performing arts events and festivals.

Table for 2 is 4… after the Big Bang
Vertical Submarine (Singapore)
Table for 2 is 4… after the Big Bang
Vertical Submarine (Singapore)

Imagining the intimate and domestic scene of a couple conversing after their meal, Vertical Submarine’s sculptural installation expands the dining table in scale, fragmenting and flipping the pieces, with all the meaningful elements that are usually above and below the table packed into a “sandwich” that exists within the typically overlooked space of a table top. The abstracted shards seem as if they are emerging from and sinking into the Concourse steps in a moment of simultaneous creation and destruction.

Vertical Submarine often construct elaborate narratives alongside their installations, and here they draw analogies to the big bang theory, which describes how the universe was formed by the explosion of a tiny, compressed singularity into complex galaxies. At the same time, the split structures of the installation hint at how more than two persons may be involved in a relationship, as the memories or reality of previous personal affairs and familial ties inevitably intrude upon any blissful pair.

Voyager
Adeline Tan and Chris Chai (Singapore)

This site-specific installation combines the distinct illustration styles and subjects of Adeline Tan and Chris Chai of Organisation of Illustrators Council (OIC). Chris’s arresting black and white pattern sets reference the geometries of machinery, architecture and other aspects of the built environment. Meanwhile, Adeline’s work takes the natural world as a source of inspiration for its strange and beautifully mutated flora and fauna. Together, the artists have created an installation that draws upon individual elements of each other’s work to create new forms, using diverse media such as drawing, painting, printing, sound and the moving image. The artists’ collaborative exchange is further symbolised by images of portals and passageways that suggest the movement between contrasting time periods of art styles and influences, making their works look at once both figurative and geometrically abstract, as well as futuristic and primeval.

Celebration 2000, by David Larwill in collaboration with the Victorian Tapestry Workshop, Australia, commissioned by the Victorian Government and Victorian Arts Centre as a gift to Esplanade – Theatres on the Bay

The panoramic view of the surrounding city from the roof garden is spectacular.

Roof Garden, Esplanade, Singapore
Roof Garden, Esplanade, Singapore

Little bears had a great tour of the Esplanade – Theatres on the Bay. Thank you Isni!

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