Sculpture by the Sea


Reflecting, Jill Smith, WA
The Earth – its life, energy and meaning, is in part a collection of actions. The choice begins as a thought.

Memory and Loss, by Tania Ferrier & Nikita Dunovits-Ferrier, WA
The artwork represents the two artists’ desire to collaborate in response to 2020. The poppy flowers express a sense of loss and the white dress expresses hope for the future.

Love Earth, by Akiho Tata, Japan
As the ground burns, viruses fly through the sky and anxiety spreads, the artist aims to capture this extraordinary time and create a marker of memory.

Dignity, by Yuko Takahashi, WA / Japan
The profile of the horse emanates beauty through its simplicity and absence of fine detail. The artist aims to evoke deep feelings of sublimity and dignity in the viewer.

Labyrinth (in search for the meaning), by Andrea Vinkovic & Claymake Studio Makers, WA
The labyrinth is a place for contemplation. There is only one path in and out so we cannot get physically lost. However, that frees our minds to wander and get lost in thoughts. This is a solitary ritual evoking a sense of mystery, a search for meaning and understanding.

Labyrinth (in search for the meaning), by Andrea Vinkovic & Claymake Studio Makers, WA

Labyrinth (in search for the meaning), by Andrea Vinkovic & Claymake Studio Makers, WA

Labyrinth (in search for the meaning), by Andrea Vinkovic & Claymake Studio Makers, WA

Labyrinth (in search for the meaning), by Andrea Vinkovic & Claymake Studio Makers, WA

The Little Boy and the Whale – Biindiirrwoorr, by Boodjar Bidi Youth Art Group, WA

ABC Radio Perth’s Christine Layton interviewed Boodjar Bidi Youth Art Group’s representative Josh Casey about the collective’s work, The Little Boy and the Whale – Biindiirrwoorr.

In an effort to promote inclusivity and culture, the Boodjar Bidi Youth Art Group presented an idea of a sculpture that would enhance the survival of dreaming stories related to Mudurup and the Perth Region. Through consultation with Traditional Owners, the Boodjar Bidi Youth Art Group conceived an idea that would tell the story of Biindiirrwoorr and Mangalla the Mamung (whale).

The artwork encapsulates an ancient dance calling to Mangalla to take Biindiirrwoorr, and the spirits of those who have passed, to Kooranup (Heaven). The figures are frozen mid dance and are scaled to one and a half times regular height. The materials are twisted steel rod to allow for visual permeability throughout the area. Finally, white powder coated steel has been incorporated to represent the traditional paint and ochre pattern related specifically to the Mangalla dance.

Biindiirrwoorr didn’t feel complete and he could feel as though his spirit was being pulled towards the west. He started to travel the land west as far as he could go and every day he would be gone longer and longer each time. He came back one day and said that he won’t be coming back because he found a place called the Kooranup, but his parents thought that one day he’d be back. One day he never came back because when he got to the most western point of our coast, the other side of Wadjemup (Rottnest Island) he saw Mangalla the Mamung and he said to Mangalla, “will you take me to the Kooranup” and Mangallla said “yes” and so Biindiirrwoorr rode Mangalla deep through the deepest parts of the ocean and found the Kooranup. – Barry McGuire

Foci, by Karl Meyer, SA
The artwork is indicative of natural processes: a reflection of form and sequencing found throughout nature that directly connect to scale within the natural world. It seeks to evoke a sense of life.

The Boab, by Tuinna Blackie, WA / New Zealand

The Boab, by Tuinna Blackie, WA / New Zealand
The artwork interprets the iconic “Tree of Life” during Western Australia’s wet season.

Knot Ocean Treasures, by Merle Topsi Davis, WA
We have dreams of sunken treasure, mermaids, wearing pearl necklaces and Neptune’s crown of gold – all hidden under the sea – but today’s reality is that our oceans are filling up with dumped fishing debris and rubbish, especially plastic waste.

Knot Ocean Treasures, by Merle Topsi Davis, WA

Knot Ocean Treasures, by Merle Topsi Davis, WA

Knot Ocean Treasures, by Merle Topsi Davis, WA

Knot Ocean Treasures, by Merle Topsi Davis, WA

Knot Ocean Treasures, by Merle Topsi Davis, WA

Yang-Yin, by Gwilym Faulkner, WA
Two bodies in unison and contradiction with the other. Inspired by the Chinese yin-yang philosophy and the idea of shared biology – some things we all have in common.

Adaptation, by Goldberg Aberline Studio
Adaptation explores how communities of organisms work together to create better environments. Communities separated by distance, age and economics have collaborated together in a virtual experiment pushing the boundaries of how we work together.

Adaptation, by Goldberg Aberline Studio
Adaptation explores how communities of organisms work together to create better environments. Communities separated by distance, age and economics have collaborated together in a virtual experiment pushing the boundaries of how we work together.

A Conversation Between a House and a Tree, by Peter Hill, WA
This is a work of dialogue and relationships, questions and interpretation. There is no statement or judgement in this sculpture, just two disparate forms that co-exist in the one location. Maybe each wrestles to claim the space solely for theselves.

Categories: Around Australia, Beary Artist, Just Having Fun

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