Category Archives: Canada

An Artistic View of the Northern Lights

And A Dark Wind Blows, by Steve Driscoll at Peter Robertson Gallery, Edmonton, AL, 2016

To recreate the wonder of viewing the Northern Lights, Steve Driscoll pumped more than 11,000 litres of water into Edmonton’s Peter Robertson Gallery.

Steve Driscoll wanted to recreate that tingly feeling you get when faced with an awesome display of nature, inside an art gallery. The visit to Peter Robertson Gallery felt like a visit to the nearest National Park. Assuming your nearest National Park is in a Northern Lights friedly viewing zone. Looking up you saw the Aurora Borealis in peacock greens and blues. Looking down you saw them again, reflected in the man-made lake.

And A Dark Wind Blows, by Steve Driscoll at Peter Robertson Gallery, Edmonton, AL, 2016
And A Dark Wind Blows, by Steve Driscoll at Peter Robertson Gallery, Edmonton, AL, 2016

Edmonton was an appropriate location for the exhibition, it is also the location for the Northern Lights Music Festival.

Steve Driscoll is a Toronto artist who has built a reputation for surreal wilderness scenes since the early 2000s. His current exibition is Just a Sliver of the Room.

Just a Sliver of the Room by Steve Driscoll

Pizza Night

Pizza for dinner… Yay!

With Canadian beer…

Little bears briefly considered other dinner options, but pizza won 🙂

But no maple syrup on the pizza!

For dessert, some funny things 🙂

You are Canadian if:

  • You know how to pronounce and spell Saskatchewan without blinking.
  • You put on shorts as soon as it hits plus 10, even if there is still snow around.
  • You are excited whenever an American television show mentions Canada.
  • You make a mental note to talk about it at work the next day.
  • You use a red pen on your non-Canadian textbooks and fill in the missing ‘u’s from labor, honor, and color.
  • You have Canadian Tire money in your kitchen drawers.
  • Pike is a type of fish, not some part of a highway.
  • You drive on a highway, not a freeway.
  • You know what a Robertson screwdriver is.
  • You understand the sentence, “Could you please pass me a serviette, I just spilled my poutine.”
  • You drink pop, not soda.
  • You love your fries with poutine.
  • You go to the washroom, not the restroom or bathroom.
  • Someone accidentally stepped on your foot. You apologize.
  • You stepped on someone’s foot. You apologize, then apologize for making them apologize.
  • You have worn shorts and a parka at the same time.
  • “Eh” is a very important part of your vocabulary and you understand all the 1,000 different meanings of “eh”, eh?

To Infinity and Beyond

Yayoi Kusama is one of the most exciting and prolific artists working today. With a practice encompassing performance, film-making, painting, drawing, sculpture, installation, fashion, poetry, fiction and public spectacles (or ‘happenings’) over some 60 years, this leading Japanese practitioner has been widely acknowledged as a major influence on several generations of contemporary artists.

Yayoi Kusama with recent works in Tokyo, 2016.  Photo by Tomoaki Makino.  Courtesy of the artist © Yayoi Kusama
Yayoi Kusama with recent works in Tokyo, 2016. Photo by Tomoaki Makino. Courtesy of the artist © Yayoi Kusama

A luminary in the cultural sphere, she became the first woman to represent Japan at the Venice Biennale in 1993 and was named one of the most influential people by Time magazine in 2016. Born in 1929, the artist spent her youth near her family’s plant nursery in Matsumoto, Japan. At nineteen, after having worked at a parachute factory during World War II, she left home for Kyoto, where she studied the traditional Japanese style of painting known as Nihonga. While there, she also began experimenting with abstraction, but it was not until she arrived in the United States, in 1957, that her career took off. Living in New York from 1958 to 1973, Kusama participated in avant-garde circles while honing her signature polka dot and net motifs, developing soft sculpture, creating installation-based works, and staging Happenings—performance-based works—around the city. The artist moved back to Japan in 1973 and, over the years, she has attained cult status, not only as an artist, but as a novelist.

Little bears discovered one of Yayoi Kusama’s stunning Infinity Mirror Rooms at GOMA and now they will happily travel half way around the world to experience an Infinity Mirror Room again!

GOMA - Yayoi Kusama, Soul under the moon, 2002. Mirrors, ultra violet lights, water, plastic, nylon thread, timber, synthetic polymer paint.
GOMA 2015 – Yayoi Kusama, Soul under the moon, 2002. Mirrors, ultra violet lights, water, plastic, nylon thread, timber, synthetic polymer paint.

How about experiencing six infinity rooms in the same exhibition?!? Organized by the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington DC, Yayoi Kusama: Infinity Mirrors will embark on the most significant North American tour of the artist’s work in nearly two decades. The Hirshhorn’s exhibition is the first to focus on the infinity mirror rooms and will present six of the rooms, the most ever shown together. From peep-show-like chambers to multimedia installations, each of these kaleidoscopic environments offers the chance to step into an illusion of infinite space. The Infinity Mirror Rooms will be on show alongside two large-scale installations and key paintings, sculptures and works on paper from the early 1950s to the present.

Yayoi Kusama, Infinity Mirrored Room—The Souls of Millions of Light Years Away, 2013. Wood, metal, mirrors, plastic, acrylic panel, rubber, LED lighting system, acrylic balls, and water. Collection of The Broad Art Foundation, Los Angeles. Installed in I Who Have Arrived in Heaven, David Zwirner, New York, 2013
Yayoi Kusama, Infinity Mirrored Room—The Souls of Millions of Light Years Away, 2013. Wood, metal, mirrors, plastic, acrylic panel, rubber, LED lighting system, acrylic balls, and water. Collection of The Broad Art Foundation, Los Angeles. Installed in I Who Have Arrived in Heaven, David Zwirner, New York, 2013
Yayoi Kusama, Dots Obsession – Love Transformed Into Dots, 2007. Interior view of large balloon dome with mirror room. Installation: Suspended vinyl balloons, large balloon dome with mirror room, peep-in mirror dome, and projected digital video. Mirror room dome height: 156 in. (396.2 cm); diameter: 234 in. (594.4 cm). Peep dome diameter: 78 in. (198.1 cm). Installed in Dots Obsession—Love Transformed into Dots, Haus der Kunst, Munich, 2007
Yayoi Kusama, Dots Obsession – Love Transformed Into Dots, 2007. Interior view of large balloon dome with mirror room. Installation: Suspended vinyl balloons, large balloon dome with mirror room, peep-in mirror dome, and projected digital video. Mirror room dome height: 156 in. (396.2 cm); diameter: 234 in. (594.4 cm). Peep dome diameter: 78 in. (198.1 cm). Installed in Dots Obsession—Love Transformed into Dots, Haus der Kunst, Munich, 2007
Yayoi Kusama, Installation view of Infinity Mirrored Room—Love Forever, 1994, in My Solitary Way to Death, Fuji Television Gallery, 1994. Wood, mirrors, metal, and lightbulbs. Collection of Ota Fine Arts. © Yayoi Kusama
Yayoi Kusama, Installation view of Infinity Mirrored Room—Love Forever, 1994, in My Solitary Way to Death, Fuji Television Gallery, 1994. Wood, mirrors, metal, and lightbulbs. Collection of Ota Fine Arts. © Yayoi Kusama
Yayoi Kusama, Installation view of Infinity Mirror Room—Phalli’s Field, 1965, in Floor Show, Castellane Gallery, New York, 1965.  Sewn stuffed cotton fabric, board, and mirrors. Courtesy of Ota Fine Arts, Tokyo/Singapore; Victoria Miro, London; David Zwirner, New York. ©
Yayoi Kusama, Installation view of Infinity Mirror Room—Phalli’s Field, 1965, in Floor Show, Castellane Gallery, New York, 1965. Sewn stuffed cotton fabric, board, and mirrors. Courtesy of Ota Fine Arts, Tokyo/Singapore; Victoria Miro, London; David Zwirner, New York. ©
Yayoi Kusama, Aftermath of Obliteration of Eternity, 2009. Wood, mirror, plastic, acrylic, LED, black glass, and aluminum. Collection of the artist. Courtesy of Ota Fine Arts, Tokyo/Singapore; Victoria Miro, London; David Zwirner, New York. © Yayoi Kusama
Yayoi Kusama, Aftermath of Obliteration of Eternity, 2009. Wood, mirror, plastic, acrylic, LED, black glass, and aluminum. Collection of the artist. Courtesy of Ota Fine Arts, Tokyo/Singapore; Victoria Miro, London; David Zwirner, New York. © Yayoi Kusama
Yayoi Kusama, All the Eternal Love I Have for the Pumpkins, 2016. Wood, mirror, plastic, black glass, LED  Collection of the artist. Courtesy of Ota Fine Arts, Tokyo / Singapore and Victoria Miro, London. © Yayoi Kusama
Yayoi Kusama, All the Eternal Love I Have for the Pumpkins, 2016. Wood, mirror, plastic, black glass, LED Collection of the artist. Courtesy of Ota Fine Arts, Tokyo / Singapore and Victoria Miro, London. © Yayoi Kusama

Kusama began using mirrors in 1965 when she produced Infinity Mirror Room — Phalli’s Field, transforming the intense repetition of her earlier two-dimensional works into a perceptual experience. Over the course of her career, Yayoi Kusama has produced more than twenty distinct Infinity Mirror Rooms. Yayoi Kusama: Infinity Mirrors traces the development of Kusama’s iconic installations alongside a selection of her other key artworks. The show highlights the artist’s central themes, such as the celebration life and its aftermath, and aims to reveal the significance of these installations amidst today’s renewed interest in experiential practices and virtual spaces.

Following its Washington, DC, debut, the show will travel to five major museums in the United States and Canada. Little bears have to patiently wait for the exhibition to reach the Art Gallery of Ontario in 2018. Hopefully they will be distracted by other adventures in the meantime, patience is not their strongest virtue!

GOMA - Yayoi Kusama, Flowers that bloom at midnight, 2011
GOMA 2015 – Yayoi Kusama, Flowers that bloom at midnight, 2011

They can distract themselves with a visit to MONA to see Dot Obsessions.

'Dot Obsessions - Tasmania' is featured in the exhibition 'On the Origins of Art', at MONA Museum of Old and New Art, Tasmania (5 November 2016 - 17 April 2017)
‘Dot Obsessions – Tasmania’ is featured in the exhibition ‘On the Origins of Art’, at MONA Museum of Old and New Art, Tasmania (5 November 2016 – 17 April 2017)

The National Art Center Tokyo will showcase YAYOI KUSAMA: My Eternal Soul from 22 February to 22 May and
National Gallery Singapore will showcase YAYOI KUSAMA: Life is the heart of a rainbow from 9 June to 3 September, the first large-scale survey of Kusama’s work in Southeast Asia, including Infinity Rooms.

Library of Parliament

Are these timbits?

Library of Parliament

No, they’re just bits.

Library of Parliament

A library!

Library of Parliament

We could play all day in there! So many things to look at!

Library of Parliament

The Library of Parliament, designed by architect Thomas Fuller and his business partner Chilion Jones, is the only remaining piece of the original parliament building constructed shortly after Ottawa became Canada’s capital in 1857. Referencing the medieval chapter house and with a layout resembling the then recently completed British Library Reading Room (Sydney Smirke, 1857), the Library of Parliament was the result of an architectural competition in 1859. Among the competition criteria, many of which are believed to have been written by Canada’s first Parliamentary Librarian Alpheus Todd, were the use of galleries and the need of fireproofing features.

Library of Parliament

In keeping with the other buildings of the parliamentary precinct, Thomas Fuller designed the library in the High Victorian Gothic Revival style. The architect believed a “Gothic building only could be adapted to a site at once so picturesque and so grand”. Site however was not the only element influencing the stylistic choice. Two decades earlier, in 1834, London’s Palace of Westminster was lost to a great fire. When time came to build a replacement, there was significant public debate on which style to follow, the fashionable Neo-Classical style or the conservative Gothic. In the end, it was decided that a Gothic building was the appropriate stylistic choice to embody the British identity, and that Neo-Classical, which was common throughout the United States, had too many connotations of revolution and republicanism. When Fuller was laying the plans for Canada’s library of parliament in the late 1850s, the new Westminster Palace was beginning to approach substantial completion. It is not surprising then that the architect would select the Gothic style, the “true British style”, for Canada’s parliamentary buildings. This however, does not take away from the building’s Canadian identity, for it would be in the detailing and choice of materials that the library would distinguish itself from its European counterparts.

The exterior of the library is defined by 16 massive flying buttresses and a colourful, rough stone exterior. A polychromatic façade, or multi-coloured exterior, is a key characteristic of the High Victorian Gothic Revival style. Four differently coloured stones were used for the exterior, all mined in Canadian quarries. Grey Gloucester limestone, grey Nepean, red Potsdam, and buff Ohio sandstone give the building a colourful yet unified appearance. In addition, purple and green slate originally covered the library’s tiered roof, but they were replaced by the now iconic copper after 1888 when a rare tornado removed much of the slate roofs of the parliamentary precinct.

Library of Parliament

The attention to texture and colour continues in the interior, which has often been described as “the most beautiful room in Canada”. The circular room is lined with white pine stacks and galleries, carefully carved with thousands of patterns, flowers, masks, and mythical creatures. Prominently displayed around the room are the coat of arms of the seven provinces existing in 1876 and one for the Dominion of Canada. Above them rises a vaulted ceiling distinguished by brightly coloured and ornamented ribs and pilasters. It is said its circular shape and high ceiling were inspired by Parliamentary Librarian Alpheus Todd who recommended the building be “spacious and lofty”. Pointed arch windows and a brightly lit cupola provide natural daylight into the building. At the centre of the building is a marble statue of young Queen Victoria, sculpted by British artist Marshall Wood in 1871.

The library's interior in 1898. Source:  William James Topley/ Library and Archives Canada
The library’s interior in 1898. Source: William James Topley/ Library and Archives Canada

Library of Parliament

The northern galleries are flanked with the white marble busts of Sir John Sandfield Macdonald; Prince Edward, Prince of Wales (later King Edward VII); Alexandra, Princess of Wales (later Queen Alexandra); and Sir Étienne-Paschal Taché.

The library’s collection comprises 600,000 items, covering hundreds of years of history and tended by a staff of 300.

The library was also designed with a number of fireproof and fire retardant features. Its chosen location, slightly removed from the rest of the Centre Block and connected by a single corridor, minimized the risk of fire spreading from one building to the other. In addition, a heavy iron door separated the library from the connecting hallway. The roof was also designed with fireproofing in mind, specifying a wrought iron structure. The pre-fabricated roof was beyond the capabilities of Canada’s building industry and had to be made in Manchester by the Thomas Fairbairn Engineering Co. Ltd. It was state of the art at the time and it is believed that the library’s dome was the first of its kind in North America.

Library of Paliament

This attention to fireproofing would prove crucial on February 3, 1916, when a great fire consumed much of the Centre Block. The removed layout of the library, its incombustible stone structure, and the closing of its heavy iron doors protected the library from any damage, and today it stands as the only remaining part of the original 1860s parliament building.

Even with all the careful fireproof planning of Thomas Fuller’s original design, the library would eventually be affected by fire in 1952. The fire broke out in the cupola of the library itself, causing significant smoke and water damage. Following the fire, reconstruction efforts were led by Toronto architecture firm of Mathers and Haldenby, who replaced the original timber elements of the dome with steel and installed additional plaster fireproofing.

The rest of the Centre Block did not survive the fire of 1916. Within twelve hours, the building was completely destroyed, except for the Library of Parliament, spared by the closing of its heavy metal doors. With the fire occurring in the midst of the First World War, rumours began to circulate a German arsonist had started the blaze, while the Toronto Globe asserted that the official cause of the fire was reported as a carelessly left cigar.

Reconstruction of the Centre Block began immediately, with a team of architects led by John A. Pearson and Jean-Omer Marchand overseeing a design much like the original, but expanded in size and pared down in ornament, more in keeping with the Beaux-Arts ethos of the time. By 1 September 1916, less than seven months after the fire, the original cornerstone was relaid by the then governor-general, Prince Arthur, Duke of Connaught and Strathearn, exactly 56 years after his brother, the future King Edward VII, had done the same. The first sitting of parliament in the new Centre Block was opened by Governor General the Duke of Devonshire on 26 January 1920.

Library of Ottawa

The Centre Block is arranged symmetrically around Confederation Hall, located immediately inside the main entrance. It is an octagonal chamber, the perimeter of which is divided by limestone clustered columns into eight bays of two different sizes, themselves subdivided by dark green syenite pillars. The arcaded arches are topped by gables sculpted to commemorate the confederated nature of Canada and they support one side of the hall’s fan vaulted ceiling with carved bosses, while the other side rests on a single column in the centre of the room. This column is borne on a stone carved with an image of Neptune amongst sea lions and fish in a mythical sea. It was placed at noon on 2 July 1917, to mark the 50th anniversary of Confederation, and above it was carved the words:

1867 JULY 1917 ON THE FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY OF THE CONFEDERATION OF BRITISH COLONIES IN NORTH AMERICA AS THE DOMINION OF CANADA THE PARLIAMENT AND PEOPLE DEDICATE THIS BUILDING IN PROCESS OF RECONSTRUCTION AFTER DAMAGE BY FIRE AS A MEMORIAL OF THE DEEDS OF THEIR FOREFATHERS AND OF THE VALOUR OF THOSE CANADIANS WHO IN THE GREAT WAR FOUGHT FOR THE LIBERTIES OF CANADA, OF THE EMPIRE AND OF HUMANITY.

Confederation Hall
Confederation Hall
Confederation Hall
Confederation Hall

Extending from Confederation Hall is the Centre Block’s north to south axis, running between the Library of Parliament and the Peace Tower, through the Hall of Honour, which serves as the route of the parades for both speakers of parliament. It is a long, rib vaulted space of Tyndall limestone divided into five bays by superimposed double arcades of lancet arches atop clustered columns on pedestals.

Hall of Honour
Hall of Honour

Running the length of the hall and resting on corbels carved into early English foliage and other customary symbols, is a ribbed vault ceiling rising to bosses carved with Tudor roses and fleur-de-lis. The hall is bisected by small, vaulted corridors, the east one leading to a committee room, and the west to the old reading room; the latter is known as the Correspondents’ Entrance, as it is lined with bosses and label stops sculpted by Cléophas Soucy between 1949 and 1950 into the visages of ten notable parliamentary correspondents: Charles Bishop, Henri Bourassa, John Wesley Dafoe, Joseph Howe, Grattan O’Leary, Frank Oliver, John Ross Robertson, Philip Dansken Ross, Joseph Israël Tarte, and Robert S. White. The north end of the hall is crossed on both levels by the Centre Block’s north corridor, with an overlooking gallery lined by iron railings by Paul Beau.

The Hall of Honour was intended to be a gallery where statues of notable Canadians would be arranged in the niches along each side. That plan was later abandoned in favour of a more general purpose of commemorating the 1916 fire, as well as honouring those who participated in the Great War. The sculptures remain incomplete; only the north end, closest to the Library of Parliament, has completed carvings. The largest of these stone sculptures is a low relief memorial to nursing in Canada, depicting those care-givers who participated in World War I, while another work, Canada Remembers, pays tribute to those who were involved in the Second World War. Two other pieces mark the efforts of early nation-building, such as that donated by Canadians living in the United States and which celebrates the 60th anniversary of Confederation.

Nurses' Memorial
Nurses’ Memorial

Parliament Buildings National Historic Site of Canada is prominently located on a hill above the Ottawa River on Wellington Street in downtown Ottawa. It includes four Gothic Revival style buildings grouped on landscaped grounds, namely the West Block, the Centre Block, the East Block, and the Library. Built 1859-1865 to serve the united provinces of Upper and Lower Canada, the Parliament Buildings were occupied by the House of Commons, Senate and departmental offices of the new Dominion of Canada after Confederation in 1867.

On Alexandra Bridge with Parliament Hill in the background
On Alexandra Bridge with Parliament Hill in the background

The Parliament Buildings were initially conceived to serve the needs of the government of the united provinces of Upper and Lower Canada; however, after Confederation in 1867, they were occupied by the House of Commons, Senate, and departmental offices of the new Dominion of Canada. Originally known as Barracks Hill, the site was chosen for its commanding location, its fine uninterrupted views of the region, and for its three decades of occupation by a military garrison and the Royal Engineers, rendering it a central focus of town social life.

Construction of the building complex began in 1859. The original buildings were examples of Ruskinian picturesque High Victorian Gothic architecture, designed by two architectural partnerships. Thomas Fuller and Chilion Jones designed the original Centre Block and Library, and Thomas Stent and Augustus Laver were responsible for the East and West Blocks. The buildings were intended to house all government activities with the East and West Blocks reserved for the entire civil service. The Centre Block was sufficiently complete in 1865 to be occupied by government departments, and it was officially opened on 6 June 1866.

The Centennial Flame commemorates Canada’s 100th anniversary as a Confederation. The Flame was first lit as part of the centennial celebrations of January 1, 1967. It was meant to be a temporary monument, but due to great public support it still stands today. Visitors and tourists throw coins into the flame’s surrounding fountain every day. A 1991 Act ensures all these coins are collected every year for the Centennial Flame Research Award Fund run by the House of Commons Comptroller. The fund supports Canadians researching disabilities.

Library of Parliament

Ottawa started as a settlement called Bytown in 1826, just a few years after the War of 1812. It was named after Lieutenant Colonel John By. He was commissioned with securing a route between Montreal and Kingston that didn’t rely on the St. Lawrence river — which came too close to the New York border for comfort. Here he would build the famous Rideau Canal Locks. These locks allow boats to enter the Ottawa river safely by raising and lowering their height slowly. Very slowly! Just like a mini Panama canal, a boat enters each lock and a team of workers hand crank the locks open and shut just like they did when Colonel By had them commissioned 180 years ago. It takes around two hours for a boat to complete the system. During the winter the canal freezes and becomes the world’s largest skating rink.

Searching for Timbits

People skate to work with their briefcases! How Canadian is that?

Library of Parliament

Right beside the locks is the tiny Bytown Museum, the oldest stone building in the city. It consists of a few floors of artifacts and memorabilia of days gone by. Here you can learn the story of Bytown as a lumber powerhouse, and see Colonel By’s hat and a large Union Jack flag recovered from the Parliament fire of 1916.

Bytown Museum
Bytown Museum

Bytown was rocking and rolling. It had a booming lumber industry and a reputation for being lawless. In 1855 they decided to change the brand, and switch the name to Ottawa, the Algonquin word for “trade.” In 1857, Queen Victoria chose Bytown to become Canada’s capital, and two years later construction of the Parliament Buildings was under way.

Well before the coming of the first European settlers, Canada’s aboriginal peoples had discovered the food properties of maple sap, which they gathered every spring. According to many historians, the maple leaf began to serve as a Canadian symbol as early as 1700.

Alexander Muir wrote The Maple Leaf Forever as Canada’s confederation song in 1867; it was regarded as the national song for several decades. The coats of arms created the next year for Ontario and Quebec both included the maple leaf. The maple leaf is the most widely recognized national symbol of Canada.

Library of Parliament

La Vue Depuis Mont Royal

La Vue Depuis Mont Royal

Puffles and Honey are at the Mont Royal lookout for a wonderful view over Montreal.

La Vue Depuis Mont Royal

Mount Royal is the jewel of Montreal’s city parks. This 200-hectare park occupies part of the mountain that lies in the midst of Montreal island, and includes the highest spot in the city (234m).

La Vue Depuis Mont Royal

La Vue Depuis Mont Royal

In the 1860s, mass cutting of trees on the mountain for firewood outraged the populace and led to the area’s designation as a park in 1876. It was originally landscaped by Frederick Law Olmsted, perhaps best known for New York City’s Central Park, although not all his proposed plans for Mount Royal were eventually carried out.

The lookout facing over downtown towards the river was first built in 1906 and is now officially known as the Belvédère Kondiaronk, named for the Huron chief who signed a major peace accord with the French regime in 1701.

La Vue Depuis Mont Royal

La Vue Depuis Mont Royal

La Vue Depuis Mont Royal

La Vue Depuis Mont Royal

A second lookout faces eastward toward the Olympic Stadium.

La Vue Depuis Mont Royal

This is the Olympic Stadium where Nadia Comaneci became the first gymnast in Olympic history to be awarded the perfect score of 10.0 for her performance on the uneven bars. She went on to record the perfect 10.0 six more times and became the youngest all-around Olympic gold medallist ever.

La Vue Depuis Mont Royal

All that fresh air and bush walking made little bears hungry so they went nearby to Reubens. Built in 1976, Reubens is home to the finest Montreal smoked meat. Puffles and Honey also found Penfolds Koonunga Hill on the wine list.

Bon Appétit!

La Vue Depuis Mont Royal

La Vue Depuis Mont Royal

Set Phasers to Awesome

Set Phasers to Awesome

Set Phasers to Awesome

Puffles and Honey went to the Canada Aviation and Space Museum for the launch of the world tour of Starfleet Academy Experience. After student orientation, Puffles and Honey visited nine zones focusing on the Academy’s special training in language, medicine, engineering, navigation, command and science. Once training was completed, Puffles and Honey received their speciality, command of course!

So they went to the bridge to test out the Captain’s chair 🙂

Set Phasers to Awesome

Set Phasers to Awesome

After which they carried out a bridge inspection.

Set Phasers to Awesome

Set Phasers to Awesome

Set Phasers to Awesome

As the Star Trek franchise celebrates its 50th anniversary, Starfleet Academy asks visitors to play cadet.

Each section has an interactive component.

In Communications, the first test is to learn basic Klingon! The video instructor was a surly Klingon who tries to teach you multiple words, including “Heghlu‘meh qaq jajvam”, which means “today is a good day to die”. After each lesson, the program tests your pronunciation. It turns out Puffles and Honey are naturals at speaking Klingon 🙂

In Medical, you hold a tricorder over the body of a mock Klingon patient. Based on the scanner’s results, you have to make a diagnosis — keeping in mind Klingons have a lot of redundancy in the form of extra body parts, including eight heart chambers and two livers. Klingon patients are notoriously “difficult” but Puffles and Honey left their patient speechless 🙂

The console in Science forces you to choose your own planetary adventure: In order to make an emergency landing, you have to pick a life-supporting crash pad for your crew. Turns out little bears can survive anywhere 🙂

Who hasn’t wanted to use a transporter to beam down to another planet? The exhibit’s Engineering section has spherical glass pods and video monitors that almost bring the magic to life. Puffles and Honey were a little disappointed to find themselves still on Earth.

The Navigation section tests your ability to plot a course to a debris-clear “warp zone”. During the simulation, Puffles and Honey managed to evade enemy ships and giant asteroids, but not the planets 🙂

The phaser simulation in the Security section tests your marksmanship on moving, coloured targets. Some required a quick hit for destruction — others a prolonged attack. Turns out security is not for them.

The final simulation is the command simulation called “the Kobayashi Maru”. The scenario involves trying to rescue the 300-person crew of a critically damaged Starfleet ship while your own is under attack by three Klingon vessels. Puffles and Honey have seen Star Trek the movie so they knew exactly what to do! They ate an apple 🙂

Set Phasers to Awesome

In each section, you can also take a quiz to determine your best role in Starfleet. The experience is enriched with the actual science behind the science fiction including emerging technologies such as a functional tricorder, NASA’s warp drive theory, and the latest experiments with phasers and teleporters.

And finally comes the shopping for memorabilia 🙂