Category Archives: Legoland

Lego’s Frank Lloyd Wright Collection

This is new!

It is, Lego has released the latest kit in their architecture series, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, for the 150th anniversary of Frank Lloyd Wright’s birth. It is a new rendition of the building. The original interpretation of the building was released by Lego in 2009. The new set provides a much more realistic portrayal of the Wright’s original building as well as the 10-story limestone tower added by Gwathmey Siegel & Associates Architects in 1992 (based on Wright’s original sketches). Arch and bow bricks make up the swooping lines of the main rotunda and the rounded edges of the base. Even the porthole side windows are represented, as well as little taxis — rendered as two yellow bricks each — and other street details.

We took the little model to Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.

The Lego Group and Adam Reed Tucker of Brickstructures, Inc. officially introduced the Lego Architecture line in 2008. In 2009, the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation announced that the Lego Group was the exclusive licensed manufacturer of Frank Lloyd Wright Collection® Legp Architecture sets.

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Fallingwater models were shown at the opening of the Frank Lloyd Wright Exhibit: From Within Outward at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in 2009, to commemorate the 50 years of the death of Frank Lloyd Wright and the 50th anniversary of the opening of the museum.

Fallingwater is one of the most famous and ingenious houses in the world.

In 2011, Lego released a model of the Robie House. Robie House was the first property to be declared a National Historic Landmark based on its architecture alone.

In 2013, the Imperial Hotel in Tokyo was the fourth Wright design to achieve micro-scale Lego-dom. The Imperial Hotel was the first set in the Lego Architecture sub-brand that is no longer with us. Having survived both 1923’s Great Kantō Earthquake and the American bombing of Tokyo during World War II, Wright’s dramatic Mayan Revival-style structure proved to be no match for the wrecking ball when it was decided, not without protest, to raze the ailing H-shaped building in 1968 and replace it with a more space-efficient modern hotel tower. Portions of the hotel including the main entrance were, however, relocated and rebuilt at an open-air architectural theme park north of Nagoya, Meiji-Mura.

We’ve been there!

Time for cupcakes!

The LEGO Batman Movie

Ready!

Have fun! And don’t expect to find any chocolates or macaroons when you get back 🙂

It’s nice to have a boy’s night out!

Universal Italian Restaurant, 139-141 Lygon St, Carlton

IMAX has very comfy chairs…

Baby Groot is coming!

Little Puffles and Jay are excited there is finally a Batman movie they can watch 🙂

The first thing to say about The Lego Batman Movie is that it’s kicky, bedazzling, and super-fun. The second thing to say about it is that, like The Lego Movie (2014), it’s a kiddie flick that’s been made in a sophisticated spirit of lightning-fast, brain-bursting paradox. Again just like The Lego Movie the majority of The Lego Batman Movie moves at such a breakneck pace that it almost becomes wearying, as the picture occasionally feels like high fructose corn syrup being injected directly into your veins. The movie looks simply fantastic, even if the 3D is wholly unnecessary, and the frame is filled with endless bits of visual imagination and genuine wit.

The movie uses digital animation to create the illusion that it’s set in a herky-jerky universe of plastic Lego bricks — but it has such a kaleidoscopic, anything-goes flow that it trumps the imagination of just about any animated feature you could name. The characters are Lego minifigures with pegs for heads and crudely etched faces that barely move, yet they have more personality than the majority of human actors. Most delicious of all: The Lego Batman Movie comes on like a kid-friendly sendup of the adult world, yet there’s a dizzying depth to its satirical observations that grows right out of the spectacularly fake settings, which are hypnotic to look at but have the effect of putting postmodern quotation marks around everything.

In The Lego Movie Will Arnett was terrific as a G-rated take on Frank Miller’s “the God-Damned Batman”. Will Arnett is back as Batman in The Lego Batman Movie with a deep low husky rasp and with a narcissistic personality disorder that’s fantastically out of control. He somehow combines the voice of Clint Eastwood, the conceitedness of Derek Zoolander, and the fast-break observational avidity of Stephen Colbert. “We’re going to punch those guys so hard,” he growls, “words describing their impact are going to spontaneously materialize.” The movie opens with Batman offering the play-by-play of his own film (“All important movies start with a black screen”), followed by a sequence as madly choreographed as anything in an Indiana Jones film, as he takes on a screenful of famous and obscure villains led by the rascally but secretly sensitive Joker (voiced by Zach Galifianakis).

This Batman, still scarred by the loss of his parents, roots his competitive identity in being a lone avenger, valiant and guarded, with no feelings, no vulnerability, no need for anyone else. In his bat lair, feasting on microwaved lobster thermidor, watching Jerry Maguire as if it were a comedy, he’s the ultimate male who won’t commit, a cowled mask of solo cool whose only loyalty is to Gotham City — but deep down, he’s doing it for his own glory. Ever since Tim Burton’s Batman, the movies have acknowledged that the Caped Crusader is a dark freak, but The Lego Batman Movie doesn’t just freakify Batman. It subjects him to nothing less than a playfully merciless psychoanalysis. The main satirical target of The Lego Batman Movie is Batman himself.

Lego Batman is brash, self-centred, obsessed with his own fame and reputation, self-delusional with regard to his influence on Gotham City (which is much worse than he notices) and the Justice League, incapable of expressing vulnerability and emotional connections to other people, rude, overall emotionally stunted, and shamefully opportunistic. He’s also talented, tough, resourceful, prepared for almost any eventuality, capable of saving the city against all odds, heroic, willing to risk his own life on a daily basis to rescue and protect society, and harbouring suppressed trauma and emotional need that causes him to push away anyone he cares about because he’s afraid of reliving the pain he experienced when he lost his parents. Heady stuff for a cartoon Lego guy.

What’s amazing is how well The Lego Batman Movie portrays these complicated personality traits and behaviours, these conflicts and contrasts and parallels, so easily and through experiencing them within the story. It’s terrific characterization and demonstrates as thorough a grasp of Batman’s psychology as any film or comic to date.

The movie pulls off a nifty balancing act: It gives the PG audience its own Batman movie (it’s a superhero starter kit) and takes swipes at the subgenre, mostly by gently mocking the seriousness that has become a deadening Warner Bros. default. The Lego Batman Movie can’t atone for a movie as grindingly bad as the studio’s Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice but at least someone on that lot gets the joke.

The cast and crew of The Lego Batman Movie sustain that joke admirably, filling in its 104-minute running time with loads of busy action, deadpan humour, visual comedy, reflexive bits and an overfamiliar story line. It features the usual cavalcade of marquee-ready talent (Rosario Dawson, Conan O’Brien, Mariah Carey), the comic and less so, but owes much of its pleasure and juice to Will Arnett. The movie puts a goofy spin on the Batman saga, but it squeezes its brightest, most sustained comedy from Mr. Arnett’s hypnotically sepulchral voice, which conveys the entire bat ethos — the Sturm und Drang, the darkness and aloneness, the resoluteness and echoiness — in vocal terms. It’s blissfully self-serious, near-Wagnerian and demented.

Why can’t non-Lego movies be as funny, exciting and weirdly moving as this?

Brickman Wonders of the World

The Brickman Wonders of the World exhibition has already been to Brisbane and Sydney and it opened in Melbourne on April 1. More than 50 awe-inspiring are on display, taking visitors on a hands-on journey through history. Brickman Wonders of the World took 4,944 hours to build.

St Basil The Blessed, Red Square, Moscow (71,689 pieces, 320 hours to build)
Ryugyong Hotel, North Korea (36,211 pieces, 97 hours to build)
Sinking Titanic (133,900 pieces, 240 hours to build)
Big Ben, London (18,437 pieces, 94 hours to build)
St Mark’s Square, Venice (21,185 pieces, 119 hours to build)
Mona Lisa, Louvre (27,011 pieces, 102 hours to build)
Leaning Tower of Pisa (41,806 pieces, 127 hours to build)
Flying Scotsman (164,611 pieces, 217 hours to build)
Oriental Pearl Tower, Shanghai (11,260 pieces, 83 hours to build)
Tokyo Subway Map (31,280 pieces, 225 hours to build)
Tokyo Subway Map detail
International Space Station (32,821 pieces, 145 hours to build)
Arc de Triumph, Paris (30,000 pieces, 170 hours to build)
Trojan Horse (9,500 pieces, 53 hours to build)
Macintosh Computer (4,500 pieces, 22 hours to build)
Macintosh Computer detail
Hanging Gardens of Babylon (24,585 pieces, 79.5 hours to build)
Hanging Gardens of Babylon (24,585 pieces, 79.5 hours to build)
Statue of Zeus at Olympia (10,000 pieces, 42 hours to build)
Temple of Artemis at Ephesus (14,517 pieces, 71 hours to build)
Great Barrier Reef (75,000 pieces, 62 hours to build)
Great Barrier Reef (75,000 pieces, 62 hours to build)

The exhibition will open in Perth on 22 June 2017.

Lego Disney Castle

Little bears are fascinated with the Lego replica of the iconic Walt Disney World Magic Kingdom Cinderella Castle.

Lego Disney Castle

Lego Disney Castle

Lego Disney Castle

WDW Magic Kingdom
WDW Magic Kingdom
With Cinderella in her castle at the Magic Kingdom WDW
With Cinderella in her castle at the Magic Kingdom WDW

The set includes Mickey Mouse, Minnie Mouse, Donald Duck, Daisy Duck and Tinker Bell. Mickey Mouse is in a tuxedo, Minnie Mouse has a red dress, Donald Duck is in his classic outfit, Daisy Duck has a pink skirt, lavender coloured shoes and a bow, and Tinker Bell comes with wings and a magic wand. Check out the two frogs from the Princess and the Frog on the right hand side!

Lego Disney Castle

The attention to detail inside the castle is amazing: stone bridges, clocks, a wide arched entrance, ornate balconies, spired towers that lead to the four-story main building. The first floor features the main hall with a large arched doorway, mosaic floor tiling, ornate chandelier, suits of armour, shield-decorated walls, grandfather clock and a floor-standing vase with buildable flower elements.

Lego Disney Castle

This being Cinderella’a Castle there is of course a pumpkin ready to turn into a carriage along with a fireplace and broom for cinders to clean each day.

Lego Disney Castle

There is even the glass slipper and fairy-tale book!

Lego Disney Castle

There is plenty in the other rooms too.

Beauty and the Beast’s wilting rose under a glass dome and Lumière.

Lego Disney Castle

Snow White’s magic mirror and poisoned apple and Tangled’s scissors and brush.

Lego Disney Castle

Sleeping Beauty’s spinning wheel.

Lego Disney Castle

Aladdin’s magic carpet and lamp.

Lego Disney Castle

Brave’s bow, arrows and target.

Lego Disney Castle

Sorcerer’s Mickey hat, broom and book of spells.

Lego Disney Castle

Launch the fireworks and let the magic begin!

A Royal Day at Magic Kingdom

A Royal Day at Magic Kingdom

A Royal Day at Magic Kingdom

Legoland California

Another Legoland!

Legoland California

Legoland California

Legoland California

Legoland California

Legoland California

Lego friends!

Legoland California

Destination Miniland. Population 8437 minilanders and counting… One bear, two bears…

Los Angeles, Griffith Observatory
Los Angeles, Griffith Observatory
Los Angeles, Hollywood Bowl
Los Angeles, Hollywood Bowl
Los Angeles, Mann's Chinese Theatre
Los Angeles, Mann’s Chinese Theatre
San Francisco, Vaillancourt Fountain
San Francisco, Vaillancourt Fountain
San Francisco
San Francisco
San Francisco, Chinatown
San Francisco, Chinatown
San Francisco
San Francisco, Pier 39
San Francisco, Golden Gate Bridge
San Francisco, Golden Gate Bridge
San Francisco, Golden Gate Bridge
San Francisco, Golden Gate Bridge
San Francisco, Golden Gate Bridge
San Francisco, Golden Gate Bridge
Las Vegas
Las Vegas
Las Vegas, MGM Grand
Las Vegas, MGM Grand
Las Vegas, MGM Grand
Las Vegas, MGM Grand
Las Vegas, Luxor
Las Vegas, Luxor
Las Vegas, Tropicana
Las Vegas, Tropicana
Las Vegas, New York
Las Vegas, New York
Las Vegas, Paris
Las Vegas, Paris
Las Vegas, Paris
Las Vegas, Paris
Las Vegas, Mirage
Las Vegas, Mirage
Las Vegas, The Venetian
Las Vegas, The Venetian
Las Vegas, Treasure Island
Las Vegas, Treasure Island
New Orleans
New Orleans
New Orleans, French Market
New Orleans, French Market
New Orleans, French Market
New Orleans, French Market
New Orleans
New Orleans
New Orleans
New Orleans
New Orleans, Mardi Gras
New Orleans, Mardi Gras
New Orleans
New Orleans
The Calliope
The Calliope
Chalmette National Historic Park
Chalmette National Historic Park
Washington DC, White House
Washington DC, White House
Washington DC, Washington Monument
Washington DC, Washington Monument
Washington DC, Capitol
Washington DC, Capitol
Washington DC, Lincoln Memorial
Washington DC, Lincoln Memorial
Washington DC
Washington DC
Washington DC, Georgetown Lock and Canal
Washington DC, Georgetown Lock and Canal
Washington DC, Historic Buildings
Washington DC, Historic Buildings
Washington DC, Historic Buildings
Washington DC, Historic Buildings

Around US With Lego

Seattle, Space Needle

A Day at the Seattle Centre

Chicago, John Hancock Centre

A Tour of Chicago in Pictures

Chicago, Sears Tower

A Tour of Chicago in Pictures

Chicago, Robie House

Robie House

Plano, Farnsworth House

Farnsworth House

Pittsburgh, Fallingwater

Fallingwater

New York City, Solomon R Guggenheim Museum

Around US With Lego

New York City, Empire State Building

Top of the Rock

New York City, Rockefeller Centre

Top of the Rock

Around US With Lego

New York City, UN Building

Around US With Lego

New York City, Flatiron Building

Around US With Lego

New York City, New York Skyline

Around US WIth Lego

Washington DC, Lincoln Memorial

Around US With Lego

Washington DC, White House

Around US WIth Lego

The Big Apple

Found it 🙂

The Big Apple

According to the New York Travel Guide, The Big Apple phrase represents New York City as world-famous for its cultural and performing arts entertainment. In the 1930’s, jazz musicians expanded the name of a Harlem nightclub, The Big Apple, to include the whole neighbourhood and the phrase eventually spread throughout the city. The Big Apple phrase resurfaced in the early 1970’s and was successfully utilised to promote tourism by the New York Convention and Visitors Bureau.